Menu Close

Australia awards Fujitsu $26M contract for ID matching, considers face biometrics database

The Australian Department of Home Affairs has awarded Fujitsu Australia an AU$37.6 million (roughly US$26.2 million) contract to handle the technology behind its Identity Matching Services (IDMS) infrastructure.

The three-year contract is only for managed services to maintain the current systems and does not add any new features to the IDMS, according to InnovationAus. The system is used in the issuance of driver’s licenses and passports.

Instead, the agreement will cover core IDMS aspects, as well as its Document Verification Service (DVS) and Face Matching Service. These systems were managed until now by NTT under a ten-year AU$27.2 million (US$19 million) deal and a seven-year AU$66.6 million (US$46.5 million) contract, respectively.

InnovationAus is also reporting that Home Affairs is considering bringing back legislation to add a face biometrics database to the IDMS, almost four years after a similar proposal was refused by the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security (PJCIS).

At the time, the proposal, which suggested the redrafting of the Identity-matching Services Bill 2019 and substantially amended a supporting bill for automating passport data sharing, was blocked because of biometric surveillance-related concerns.

In particular, the proposed legislation would have expanded the IDMS reach to include several new services to biometrically identify, recognize and face images.

Fast forward to today, InnovationAus is suggesting that while Home Affairs has dropped the bill, it has still been looking at the creation of legislation in support of a national facial recognition database.

Home Affairs reportedly confirmed that amendments to the proposed legislation and addressing the PJCIS recommendations were brought forward in 2020.

However, a spokesperson for the PJCIS told InnovationAus this week that the inquiry has followed those plans, which now rest in the hands of Home Affairs minister Clare O’Neil and Attorney General Mark Dreyfus.

The IDMS updates come weeks after University of Sydney Law School professor Kimberlee Weatherall discussed how outdated privacy laws are reportedly exposing Australian residents to improper collection and use of biometrics. The Australian Department of Home Affairs has awarded Fujitsu Australia an AU$37.6 million (roughly US$26.2 million) contract to handle the technology behind its Identity Matching Services (IDMS) infrastructure.

The three-year contract is only for managed services to maintain the current systems and does not add any new features to the IDMS, according to InnovationAus. The system is used in the issuance of driver’s licenses and passports.

Instead, the agreement will cover core IDMS aspects, as well as its Document Verification Service (DVS) and Face Matching Service. These systems were managed until now by NTT under a ten-year AU$27.2 million (US$19 million) deal and a seven-year AU$66.6 million (US$46.5 million) contract, respectively.

InnovationAus is also reporting that Home Affairs is considering bringing back legislation to add a face biometrics database to the IDMS, almost four years after a similar proposal was refused by the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security (PJCIS).

At the time, the proposal, which suggested the redrafting of the Identity-matching Services Bill 2019 and substantially amended a supporting bill for automating passport data sharing, was blocked because of biometric surveillance-related concerns.

In particular, the proposed legislation would have expanded the IDMS reach to include several new services to biometrically identify, recognize and face images.

Fast forward to today, InnovationAus is suggesting that while Home Affairs has dropped the bill, it has still been looking at the creation of legislation in support of a national facial recognition database.

Home Affairs reportedly confirmed that amendments to the proposed legislation and addressing the PJCIS recommendations were brought forward in 2020.

However, a spokesperson for the PJCIS told InnovationAus this week that the inquiry has followed those plans, which now rest in the hands of Home Affairs minister Clare O’Neil and Attorney General Mark Dreyfus.

The IDMS updates come weeks after University of Sydney Law School professor Kimberlee Weatherall discussed how outdated privacy laws are reportedly exposing Australian residents to improper collection and use of biometrics.  Read More   

Generated by Feedzy

Disclaimer

Innov8 is owned and operated by Rolling Rock Ventures. The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Any information obtained from this website should be reviewed with appropriate parties if there is any concern about the details reported herein. Innov8 is not responsible for its contents, accuracies, and any inaccuracies. Nothing on this site should be construed as professional advice for any individual or situation. This website includes information and content from external sites that is attributed accordingly and is not the intellectual property of Innov8. All feeds ("RSS Feed") and/or their contents contain material which is derived in whole or in part from material supplied by third parties and is protected by national and international copyright and trademark laws. The Site processes all information automatically using automated software without any human intervention or screening. Therefore, the Site is not responsible for any (part) of this content. The copyright of the feeds', including pictures and graphics, and its content belongs to its author or publisher.  Views and statements expressed in the content do not necessarily reflect those of Innov8 or its staff. Care and due diligence has been taken to maintain the accuracy of the information provided on this website. However, neither Innov8 nor the owners, attorneys, management, editorial team or any writers or employees are responsible for its content, errors or any consequences arising from use of the information provided on this website. The Site may modify, suspend, or discontinue any aspect of the RSS Feed at any time, including, without limitation, the availability of any Site content.  The User agrees that all RSS Feeds and news articles are for personal use only and that the User may not resell, lease, license, assign, redistribute or otherwise transfer any portion of the RSS Feed without attribution to the Site and to its originating author. The Site does not represent or warrant that every action taken with regard to your account and related activities in connection with the RSS Feed, including, without limitation, the Site Content, will be lawful in any particular jurisdiction. It is incumbent upon the user to know the laws that pertain to you in your jurisdiction and act lawfully at all times when using the RSS Feed, including, without limitation, the Site Content.  

Close Bitnami banner
Bitnami