Menu Close

Clinical research shows infant fingerprint biometrics nearing real-world effectiveness

Confirming the identity of newborns in healthcare settings with biometrics may be within reach with current technology, according to a new academic research paper published by the U.S National Library of Medicine.

Biometric recognition of newborns and young children for vaccinations and health care: a non-randomized prospective clinical trial’ is co-authored by researchers from the University of California San Diego, Universidad Autonóma de Baja California in Tijuana, and Hospital Central Tijuana. It describes a fingerprint biometric system for “longitudinal” recognition in support of vaccinations and clinical follow-ups.

The researchers enrolled and followed just under 500 children for up to two years. Ten fingers were images from each, with failure to enroll rates for two fingers of below 1 percent, and for four fingers of below two percent. The tests were carried out in Baja, Mexico, between 2017 and 2019.

Compared between 15 and 30 days later with a false accept rate set at 0.1 percent, the true accept rate (TAR) for biometric verifications was 77 percent for newborns enrolled within the first three days of life, but 96 percent for those enrolled at four days or older.

Identification accuracy was higher, using the top-ranked match score, at 86 percent of those enrolled in the first three days, and 97 percent for those enrolled later.

The device used is one developed in-house by UC San Diego researchers, and discussed with Biometric Update in some depth. The team is now seeking to commercialize the device in collaboration with NEC.

The biometric device and example imagery used in this study.

The platen-free, contactless design alleviates some challenges faced by other techniques for infant fingerprinting, but also adds some complexity to the process, according to the paper.

The researchers note that “The enrollment protocol and the frequency of updating will increase for infants compared to adults. However, these data suggest that a high-resolution, free space imaging technique may fill the final gap for universal biometrics across all populations called for by the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 16.9.” Confirming the identity of newborns in healthcare settings with biometrics may be within reach with current technology, according to a new academic research paper published by the U.S National Library of Medicine.

‘Biometric recognition of newborns and young children for vaccinations and health care: a non-randomized prospective clinical trial’ is co-authored by researchers from the University of California San Diego, Universidad Autonóma de Baja California in Tijuana, and Hospital Central Tijuana. It describes a fingerprint biometric system for “longitudinal” recognition in support of vaccinations and clinical follow-ups.

The researchers enrolled and followed just under 500 children for up to two years. Ten fingers were images from each, with failure to enroll rates for two fingers of below 1 percent, and for four fingers of below two percent. The tests were carried out in Baja, Mexico, between 2017 and 2019.

Compared between 15 and 30 days later with a false accept rate set at 0.1 percent, the true accept rate (TAR) for biometric verifications was 77 percent for newborns enrolled within the first three days of life, but 96 percent for those enrolled at four days or older.

Identification accuracy was higher, using the top-ranked match score, at 86 percent of those enrolled in the first three days, and 97 percent for those enrolled later.

The device used is one developed in-house by UC San Diego researchers, and discussed with Biometric Update in some depth. The team is now seeking to commercialize the device in collaboration with NEC.

The biometric device and example imagery used in this study.

The platen-free, contactless design alleviates some challenges faced by other techniques for infant fingerprinting, but also adds some complexity to the process, according to the paper.

The researchers note that “The enrollment protocol and the frequency of updating will increase for infants compared to adults. However, these data suggest that a high-resolution, free space imaging technique may fill the final gap for universal biometrics across all populations called for by the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 16.9.”  Read More   

Generated by Feedzy

Disclaimer

Innov8 is owned and operated by Rolling Rock Ventures. The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Any information obtained from this website should be reviewed with appropriate parties if there is any concern about the details reported herein. Innov8 is not responsible for its contents, accuracies, and any inaccuracies. Nothing on this site should be construed as professional advice for any individual or situation. This website includes information and content from external sites that is attributed accordingly and is not the intellectual property of Innov8. All feeds ("RSS Feed") and/or their contents contain material which is derived in whole or in part from material supplied by third parties and is protected by national and international copyright and trademark laws. The Site processes all information automatically using automated software without any human intervention or screening. Therefore, the Site is not responsible for any (part) of this content. The copyright of the feeds', including pictures and graphics, and its content belongs to its author or publisher.  Views and statements expressed in the content do not necessarily reflect those of Innov8 or its staff. Care and due diligence has been taken to maintain the accuracy of the information provided on this website. However, neither Innov8 nor the owners, attorneys, management, editorial team or any writers or employees are responsible for its content, errors or any consequences arising from use of the information provided on this website. The Site may modify, suspend, or discontinue any aspect of the RSS Feed at any time, including, without limitation, the availability of any Site content.  The User agrees that all RSS Feeds and news articles are for personal use only and that the User may not resell, lease, license, assign, redistribute or otherwise transfer any portion of the RSS Feed without attribution to the Site and to its originating author. The Site does not represent or warrant that every action taken with regard to your account and related activities in connection with the RSS Feed, including, without limitation, the Site Content, will be lawful in any particular jurisdiction. It is incumbent upon the user to know the laws that pertain to you in your jurisdiction and act lawfully at all times when using the RSS Feed, including, without limitation, the Site Content.  

Close Bitnami banner
Bitnami