Menu Close

ICE issues annual report. So where are details on biometrics programs?

U.S. immigration officials have released their latest annual report which, from a biometrics standpoint, is notable for its lack of information on identity verification programs.

Searching the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency’s 75-page fiscal ’22 annual report for the word biometric turns up one result.

About 11,500 people were enrolled in an ICE biometric database during the year ended September 30.

Facial, fingerprint and iris recognition could be used in any number of roles, from border control to transnational financial crime, but if they are deployed beyond a few missions publicized by officials last year, it was not deemed worthy of being detailed in the report.

For most people, ICE’s big move into biometrics has been its decision to contract with GEO Group for face-scanning monitor products and services under the Smartlink brand. It is an alternative to detention for would-be migrants who are judged to be compliant and little risk to communities.

It works on a phone provided by the government. Proponents say required check-ins and court reminders in theory can be done more rapidly and efficiently.

Smartlink has its detractors (it reportedly collects a lot of personal data and still makes asylum-seekers feel like criminals, which they are not), it is a new program and it is a flyspeck in ICE’s $8 billion budget. But it is hard to understand why it could not get a spotlight.

ICE’s parent, the Department of Homeland Security, also has awarded a contract to face-scraper subscription service Clearview AI. ICE reportedly is using the facial recognition service to rescue children from sexual abuse.

Yet, no mention of this program – with a potential pool of 4.7 million would-be immigrants — is made.

There is little doubt that some of the activities written of in the report involve facial recognition and other biometric identification tools.

ICE’s Cyber Crimes Center claims in the report to have rescued 1,170 children in the fiscal year alone, for example.

Maybe facial recognition has become so interwoven into the fabric of ICE’s operations, it no longer requires mentioning. U.S. immigration officials have released their latest annual report which, from a biometrics standpoint, is notable for its lack of information on identity verification programs.

Searching the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency’s 75-page fiscal ’22 annual report for the word biometric turns up one result.

About 11,500 people were enrolled in an ICE biometric database during the year ended September 30.

Facial, fingerprint and iris recognition could be used in any number of roles, from border control to transnational financial crime, but if they are deployed beyond a few missions publicized by officials last year, it was not deemed worthy of being detailed in the report.

For most people, ICE’s big move into biometrics has been its decision to contract with GEO Group for face-scanning monitor products and services under the Smartlink brand. It is an alternative to detention for would-be migrants who are judged to be compliant and little risk to communities.

It works on a phone provided by the government. Proponents say required check-ins and court reminders in theory can be done more rapidly and efficiently.

Smartlink has its detractors (it reportedly collects a lot of personal data and still makes asylum-seekers feel like criminals, which they are not), it is a new program and it is a flyspeck in ICE’s $8 billion budget. But it is hard to understand why it could not get a spotlight.

ICE’s parent, the Department of Homeland Security, also has awarded a contract to face-scraper subscription service Clearview AI. ICE reportedly is using the facial recognition service to rescue children from sexual abuse.

Yet, no mention of this program – with a potential pool of 4.7 million would-be immigrants — is made.

There is little doubt that some of the activities written of in the report involve facial recognition and other biometric identification tools.

ICE’s Cyber Crimes Center claims in the report to have rescued 1,170 children in the fiscal year alone, for example.

Maybe facial recognition has become so interwoven into the fabric of ICE’s operations, it no longer requires mentioning.  Read More   

Generated by Feedzy

Disclaimer

Innov8 is owned and operated by Rolling Rock Ventures. The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Any information obtained from this website should be reviewed with appropriate parties if there is any concern about the details reported herein. Innov8 is not responsible for its contents, accuracies, and any inaccuracies. Nothing on this site should be construed as professional advice for any individual or situation. This website includes information and content from external sites that is attributed accordingly and is not the intellectual property of Innov8. All feeds ("RSS Feed") and/or their contents contain material which is derived in whole or in part from material supplied by third parties and is protected by national and international copyright and trademark laws. The Site processes all information automatically using automated software without any human intervention or screening. Therefore, the Site is not responsible for any (part) of this content. The copyright of the feeds', including pictures and graphics, and its content belongs to its author or publisher.  Views and statements expressed in the content do not necessarily reflect those of Innov8 or its staff. Care and due diligence has been taken to maintain the accuracy of the information provided on this website. However, neither Innov8 nor the owners, attorneys, management, editorial team or any writers or employees are responsible for its content, errors or any consequences arising from use of the information provided on this website. The Site may modify, suspend, or discontinue any aspect of the RSS Feed at any time, including, without limitation, the availability of any Site content.  The User agrees that all RSS Feeds and news articles are for personal use only and that the User may not resell, lease, license, assign, redistribute or otherwise transfer any portion of the RSS Feed without attribution to the Site and to its originating author. The Site does not represent or warrant that every action taken with regard to your account and related activities in connection with the RSS Feed, including, without limitation, the Site Content, will be lawful in any particular jurisdiction. It is incumbent upon the user to know the laws that pertain to you in your jurisdiction and act lawfully at all times when using the RSS Feed, including, without limitation, the Site Content.  

Close Bitnami banner
Bitnami