Menu Close

Irish PM pushes laws to allow police body cams, license plate recognition

Ireland’s Prime Minister Leo Varadkar has said he intends to expedite the enactment of legislation to clarify the wearing of body cams by police to increase prosecutions and to protect officers, reports the Irish Times.

The Garda Síochána (Recording Devices) Bill 2022 includes a long list of provisions which have proved controversial. They span the installation of CCTV for particular purposes or via drones, the monitoring of calls to and from the national police (Garda Síochána), allowing the use of ANPR (automatic number plate recognition/license plate recognition, LPR) and its retained data, making it an offense to not hand over CCTV data to police.

The Bill also allows for the “processing” of live CCTV feeds.

The Bill has passed the first stage of the 11-stage process, by being present to the Dáil Éireann (lower house) in August 2022. It is expected to undergo the next stage – general debate – in January when the Dáil reopens.

Ahead of the introduction of the Bill, Ireland’s Minister for Justice, Helen McEntee, announced that her team would bring in further legislation to allow facial recognition of CCTV feeds, including live processing. The Bill does not appear to have been amended.

Ireland’s government and civil society have been wrestling with the appropriate role of facial recognition in policing, which is not explicitly dealt with in the Recording Devices Bill.

Body cams and ANPR are already in use in Ireland, though with a lack of clarity around correct deployment which has led to fines.

Justice Minister Heather Humphrey has already confirmed that body cams with recording capabilities are being brought in and that €3 million (US$3.16 million) has been allocated for preparatory work to support the tech’s introduction, reports the Irish Mirror. Ireland’s Prime Minister Leo Varadkar has said he intends to expedite the enactment of legislation to clarify the wearing of body cams by police to increase prosecutions and to protect officers, reports the Irish Times.

The Garda Síochána (Recording Devices) Bill 2022 includes a long list of provisions which have proved controversial. They span the installation of CCTV for particular purposes or via drones, the monitoring of calls to and from the national police (Garda Síochána), allowing the use of ANPR (automatic number plate recognition/license plate recognition, LPR) and its retained data, making it an offense to not hand over CCTV data to police.

The Bill also allows for the “processing” of live CCTV feeds.

The Bill has passed the first stage of the 11-stage process, by being present to the Dáil Éireann (lower house) in August 2022. It is expected to undergo the next stage – general debate – in January when the Dáil reopens.

Ahead of the introduction of the Bill, Ireland’s Minister for Justice, Helen McEntee, announced that her team would bring in further legislation to allow facial recognition of CCTV feeds, including live processing. The Bill does not appear to have been amended.

Ireland’s government and civil society have been wrestling with the appropriate role of facial recognition in policing, which is not explicitly dealt with in the Recording Devices Bill.

Body cams and ANPR are already in use in Ireland, though with a lack of clarity around correct deployment which has led to fines.

Justice Minister Heather Humphrey has already confirmed that body cams with recording capabilities are being brought in and that €3 million (US$3.16 million) has been allocated for preparatory work to support the tech’s introduction, reports the Irish Mirror.  Read More   

Generated by Feedzy

Disclaimer

Innov8 is owned and operated by Rolling Rock Ventures. The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Any information obtained from this website should be reviewed with appropriate parties if there is any concern about the details reported herein. Innov8 is not responsible for its contents, accuracies, and any inaccuracies. Nothing on this site should be construed as professional advice for any individual or situation. This website includes information and content from external sites that is attributed accordingly and is not the intellectual property of Innov8. All feeds ("RSS Feed") and/or their contents contain material which is derived in whole or in part from material supplied by third parties and is protected by national and international copyright and trademark laws. The Site processes all information automatically using automated software without any human intervention or screening. Therefore, the Site is not responsible for any (part) of this content. The copyright of the feeds', including pictures and graphics, and its content belongs to its author or publisher.  Views and statements expressed in the content do not necessarily reflect those of Innov8 or its staff. Care and due diligence has been taken to maintain the accuracy of the information provided on this website. However, neither Innov8 nor the owners, attorneys, management, editorial team or any writers or employees are responsible for its content, errors or any consequences arising from use of the information provided on this website. The Site may modify, suspend, or discontinue any aspect of the RSS Feed at any time, including, without limitation, the availability of any Site content.  The User agrees that all RSS Feeds and news articles are for personal use only and that the User may not resell, lease, license, assign, redistribute or otherwise transfer any portion of the RSS Feed without attribution to the Site and to its originating author. The Site does not represent or warrant that every action taken with regard to your account and related activities in connection with the RSS Feed, including, without limitation, the Site Content, will be lawful in any particular jurisdiction. It is incumbent upon the user to know the laws that pertain to you in your jurisdiction and act lawfully at all times when using the RSS Feed, including, without limitation, the Site Content.  

Close Bitnami banner
Bitnami