Menu Close

Leak of police biometric data won’t change America’s regulation debate

A significant theft of public safety-related biometric data in the United States this weekend will not slow the adoption of facial recognition by law enforcement.

That is despite repeated and rote assurances that any biometric data collected by police is by definition safe from theft or misuse.

There are a number of reports about the servers of police IT contractor Odin Intelligence being hacked over the weekend. It is possible that a facial recognition algorithm called AFR Engine was being used by the police whose information was hacked.

According to technology news publisher Vice, 15GB of data, including biometrics involving unhoused people and criminals, have been stolen and shared. A group Vice described as a transparency organization – Distributed Denial of Secrets – reportedly was given the files and shared them with another Vice Media Group publication.

The data included mugshots and fingerprint biometrics, according to TechCrunch. At least some of the data is reportedly unencrypted.

A leak of biometric data from police was not unexpected.

There was a short period, coincidentally around the advent of the pandemic, when governments around the nation were creating moratoriums on governmental biometric identification and surveillance.

Indeed, many U.S. opponents of biometric surveillance blankets said there was no reason to think any law enforcement agency can protect personal data. They are trained no better than any other governmental unit, and their record in one area of their expertise, keeping dangerous people in custody, has blemishes.

But that skepticism has all but disappeared, overwhelmed by a new narrative. Personal and property safety are threatened. Often, people are being told migrants are the threat.

People – especially property owners — are being told America is more dangerous and that cameras are an inexpensive way to stop people from committing crime. Of course, robberies still occur often in banks, gas stations and convenience stores, all of which were among the earliest adopters of in-store surveillance.

Odin’s leak reportedly held thousands of images, including people forced to live in the streets and sex offenders. Other data was collected for tactical plans for raids on criminal locations, according to technology news publication TechCrunch.

Instead of demanding responsibility in how law enforcement holds biometric identifiers, the people most fearful of crime and most able to apply pressure on governments to secure data have bet that they will be left untouched by leaks.

That is a fallacy that will come back to haunt. A significant theft of public safety-related biometric data in the United States this weekend will not slow the adoption of facial recognition by law enforcement.

That is despite repeated and rote assurances that any biometric data collected by police is by definition safe from theft or misuse.

There are a number of reports about the servers of police IT contractor Odin Intelligence being hacked over the weekend. It is possible that a facial recognition algorithm called AFR Engine was being used by the police whose information was hacked.

According to technology news publisher Vice, 15GB of data, including biometrics involving unhoused people and criminals, have been stolen and shared. A group Vice described as a transparency organization – Distributed Denial of Secrets – reportedly was given the files and shared them with another Vice Media Group publication.

The data included mugshots and fingerprint biometrics, according to TechCrunch. At least some of the data is reportedly unencrypted.

A leak of biometric data from police was not unexpected.

There was a short period, coincidentally around the advent of the pandemic, when governments around the nation were creating moratoriums on governmental biometric identification and surveillance.

Indeed, many U.S. opponents of biometric surveillance blankets said there was no reason to think any law enforcement agency can protect personal data. They are trained no better than any other governmental unit, and their record in one area of their expertise, keeping dangerous people in custody, has blemishes.

But that skepticism has all but disappeared, overwhelmed by a new narrative. Personal and property safety are threatened. Often, people are being told migrants are the threat.

People – especially property owners — are being told America is more dangerous and that cameras are an inexpensive way to stop people from committing crime. Of course, robberies still occur often in banks, gas stations and convenience stores, all of which were among the earliest adopters of in-store surveillance.

Odin’s leak reportedly held thousands of images, including people forced to live in the streets and sex offenders. Other data was collected for tactical plans for raids on criminal locations, according to technology news publication TechCrunch.

Instead of demanding responsibility in how law enforcement holds biometric identifiers, the people most fearful of crime and most able to apply pressure on governments to secure data have bet that they will be left untouched by leaks.

That is a fallacy that will come back to haunt.  Read More   

Generated by Feedzy

Disclaimer

Innov8 is owned and operated by Rolling Rock Ventures. The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Any information obtained from this website should be reviewed with appropriate parties if there is any concern about the details reported herein. Innov8 is not responsible for its contents, accuracies, and any inaccuracies. Nothing on this site should be construed as professional advice for any individual or situation. This website includes information and content from external sites that is attributed accordingly and is not the intellectual property of Innov8. All feeds ("RSS Feed") and/or their contents contain material which is derived in whole or in part from material supplied by third parties and is protected by national and international copyright and trademark laws. The Site processes all information automatically using automated software without any human intervention or screening. Therefore, the Site is not responsible for any (part) of this content. The copyright of the feeds', including pictures and graphics, and its content belongs to its author or publisher.  Views and statements expressed in the content do not necessarily reflect those of Innov8 or its staff. Care and due diligence has been taken to maintain the accuracy of the information provided on this website. However, neither Innov8 nor the owners, attorneys, management, editorial team or any writers or employees are responsible for its content, errors or any consequences arising from use of the information provided on this website. The Site may modify, suspend, or discontinue any aspect of the RSS Feed at any time, including, without limitation, the availability of any Site content.  The User agrees that all RSS Feeds and news articles are for personal use only and that the User may not resell, lease, license, assign, redistribute or otherwise transfer any portion of the RSS Feed without attribution to the Site and to its originating author. The Site does not represent or warrant that every action taken with regard to your account and related activities in connection with the RSS Feed, including, without limitation, the Site Content, will be lawful in any particular jurisdiction. It is incumbent upon the user to know the laws that pertain to you in your jurisdiction and act lawfully at all times when using the RSS Feed, including, without limitation, the Site Content.  

Close Bitnami banner
Bitnami